Author Topic: Reading Music  (Read 1108 times)

  • dibts
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Reading Music
« on: April 22, 2015, 07:49:03 AM »
How many of you here know how to read music? Is it really important that you know how to? What are the benefits and is it always used when working in the studio?

Re: Reading Music
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2015, 09:57:40 AM »
I can read a little music, but I don't think it helps that much with singing. Lots of singers don't read music as far as I know

Re: Reading Music
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2015, 09:49:36 PM »
I used to be better at reading music when I was much younger and made an attempt at piano lessons. Really, I think it’s more helpful during vocal training, or maybe or if you sing in a choir or do any kind of opera or musical theater. I remember bombing a few sight readings when I was trying to learn new songs in voice training and theater, but other than that I’ve never really needed to know how to read music. It seems to be more of a bonus than anything else. Having a basic grasp on guitar tablature has been helpful, though.

  • Paradox
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Re: Reading Music
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2015, 07:49:44 PM »
I can read music fairly well to the point I can compose music sheets of the sorts however I don't believe it's generally necessary unless you're playing an instrument. If you're singing or using your voice then you won't really need it at all to be honest since there's more of a vibe that your voice can go on. The benefits in reading music is that you would be able to work with others easily if they play instruments and also read music. It can help with timing and a few other things associated with the sheets but overall these days there's so many artists out there that probably have no idea what any of the notes, key signatures, or accents mean and they're doing just fine without it.

Re: Reading Music
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2015, 06:41:07 PM »
I used to be able to read music a very little bit.  I took piano lessons back in the day and had a terrible time learning to read music.  I could always pick out one note and would have to use that as a guidepost to determine the other notes.  I may try learning it again now that there is probably an app that will help me. ha.

Re: Reading Music
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2015, 11:13:43 AM »
I think being able to read music is a great skill to have, since it opens up a lot of opportunities for you as a musician.  However, if you're mostly interested in writing your own stuff, it's not completely necessary, since most DAWs have an intuitive piano roll in addition to standard notation for midi instruments.  If you ever want to play in a more formal music ensemble (orchestra, jazz band, etc.), then it would be a good idea to learn music notation.  For me, I'd say the biggest advantage of being able to read music is that it helps me conceptualize and organize my ideas when I'm writing a song or melody, since I have visual elements to represent the notes I'm imagining.

Re: Reading Music
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2015, 02:34:00 AM »
I think being able to read music is a great skill to have, since it opens up a lot of opportunities for you as a musician.  However, if you're mostly interested in writing your own stuff, it's not completely necessary, since most DAWs have an intuitive piano roll in addition to standard notation for midi instruments.  If you ever want to play in a more formal music ensemble (orchestra, jazz band, etc.), then it would be a good idea to learn music notation.  For me, I'd say the biggest advantage of being able to read music is that it helps me conceptualize and organize my ideas when I'm writing a song or melody, since I have visual elements to represent the notes I'm imagining.


This! I completely agree.
However, when I talk to musicians who don't read or who don't know much theory, I always like to stress this point. I not only think it's a valuable skill that opens up doors for you; rather, I think it should be a crucial skill to any musician who aspires to compose, and really anyone who wants to take a big next step with music unless they're very much into doing their solo thing.
For example, hey, you sometimes come across interesting musicians with fresh ideas who are foreigners. If you can't connect very well through language, I've found writing and reading notation can help you overcome this and have worthy experiences.
To me it's a bit like that - like writing another language - so that can only be a good thing; another weapon in your arsenal, so to speak.