Author Topic: Harmonic Theory: Transposing / Transitioning to A New Key  (Read 1449 times)

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Harmonic Theory: Transposing / Transitioning to A New Key
« on: September 02, 2013, 04:03:21 PM »
Can someone help me with transitioning from one key to another in the middle of a composition or track? It always seems to be very abrupt and awkward sounding when I switch to a different key in any of my beats...I thought this was a pretty normal thing in composition so I don't understand why it sounds so off when I attempt it... :(
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Re: Harmonic Theory: Transposing / Transitioning to A New Key
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2013, 06:58:13 PM »
I struggled with this for a long time too. It can sound a lot more natural if you pick the right key to transition to, relative to which one your coming out of. Ideally you want to use what's known as a "pivot chord" or in other words a chord that the 2 different keys both share - this will help the transition go smoothly and not sound so abrupt and unusual. There are a lot of creative ways to modulate from one key to another, but there are also a lot of wrong ways to do it. Increasing your knowledge of harmonic progression will help you understand what will typically sound correct when moving from one chord to another, as opposed to random selection of chords which will result in what you described as awkward sounding - unless you get lucky in your random selection lol.

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Re: Harmonic Theory: Transposing / Transitioning to A New Key
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2013, 09:50:21 AM »
I struggled with this for a long time too. It can sound a lot more natural if you pick the right key to transition to, relative to which one your coming out of. Ideally you want to use what's known as a "pivot chord" or in other words a chord that the 2 different keys both share - this will help the transition go smoothly and not sound so abrupt and unusual. There are a lot of creative ways to modulate from one key to another, but there are also a lot of wrong ways to do it. Increasing your knowledge of harmonic progression will help you understand what will typically sound correct when moving from one chord to another, as opposed to random selection of chords which will result in what you described as awkward sounding - unless you get lucky in your random selection lol.

Thanks man, that's helpful. I didn't realize that every key shares chords until you said that lmao. It makes sense transitioning to a new scale that has a shared chord would sound more natural than picking a random one like I was -.- Gonna play w/ this idea n see what I can come up with
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Re: Harmonic Theory: Transposing / Transitioning to A New Key
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2015, 09:34:38 AM »
I have discoverd,that using the cycle of 4ths,5ths help. Using the 11th chord made like this C11--Bb,D,F/C in the base does not really demand a chord resolution.

Re: Harmonic Theory: Transposing / Transitioning to A New Key
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2015, 05:56:13 AM »

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