Author Topic: Stuck in D minor  (Read 1111 times)

  • JPB_003
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Stuck in D minor
« on: April 04, 2015, 02:15:13 AM »
Can anyone give me some advice how to break out of the same keys I am used to using?

Any serious/sad song is always in D Minor, and every happy tune is in E major. I try to bring in various majors and minors, but I am stuck with how ..."flat" they sound.

Any thoughts?

  • Thejamal
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Re: Stuck in D minor
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2015, 02:49:36 PM »
Can anyone give me some advice how to break out of the same keys I am used to using?

Any serious/sad song is always in D Minor, and every happy tune is in E major. I try to bring in various majors and minors, but I am stuck with how ..."flat" they sound.

Any thoughts?

What instrument are you using? Or are you singing? Regardless, something you can do is start to play those tunes in other keys  to give them a kickstart. So if you're always stuck in D Minor, play the song in A minor and see what happens. Playing tunes you already know in another key is kind of tough at first if you've never done it before, but something that helps me is to think of tunes as scale degrees rather than actual notes. That way, it doesn't matter what key you're in as the song will start on the same scale degree every time.

  • JPB_003
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Re: Stuck in D minor
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2015, 07:42:16 PM »
Can anyone give me some advice how to break out of the same keys I am used to using?

Any serious/sad song is always in D Minor, and every happy tune is in E major. I try to bring in various majors and minors, but I am stuck with how ..."flat" they sound.

Any thoughts?

What instrument are you using? Or are you singing? Regardless, something you can do is start to play those tunes in other keys  to give them a kickstart. So if you're always stuck in D Minor, play the song in A minor and see what happens. Playing tunes you already know in another key is kind of tough at first if you've never done it before, but something that helps me is to think of tunes as scale degrees rather than actual notes. That way, it doesn't matter what key you're in as the song will start on the same scale degree every time.

I should have been more specific. I am talking about producing.

The instruments I play, it is easier to switch keys in my opinion.

I just feel like I get stuck in a pattern of making the same type of song is what I meant to say originally.

Re: Stuck in D minor
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2015, 09:31:17 AM »
The Dminor key is the relative minor to the key of F. If you understand that, then you can go to the 2nd of F which will be your Gminor . If you count up from F, you will discover that the 6 note is a D. If you go down a minor third from F ie: F-E-D, you will find the D note. The key to your issue is understanding chord allocation according to the scale. Not sure what your knowledge base is. But remember this. The 1st,4th and 5th notes in the scale has a major chord assignment major. The 2nd, 3rd and 6th notes in the scale has a minor chord assignment.The 7th note in the scale has a diminished chord assignment. It will always be that unless otherwise indicated. A math equation to help you remember this is this--1+4=5/major chords,2x3=6/minor chord. 1,4,5= major chord,2.3,6=minor chord. I hope that helped. This applies to all instruments,but most visilbe on the keyboard. Peace.

  • 2infamouz
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Re: Stuck in D minor
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2015, 09:42:24 AM »
The Dminor key is the relative minor to the key of F. If you understand that, then you can go to the 2nd of F which will be your Gminor . If you count up from F, you will discover that the 6 note is a D. If you go down a minor third from F ie: F-E-D, you will find the D note. The key to your issue is understanding chord allocation according to the scale. Not sure what your knowledge base is. But remember this. The 1st,4th and 5th notes in the scale has a major chord assignment major. The 2nd, 3rd and 6th notes in the scale has a minor chord assignment.The 7th note in the scale has a diminished chord assignment. It will always be that unless otherwise indicated. A math equation to help you remember this is this--1+4=5/major chords,2x3=6/minor chord. 1,4,5= major chord,2.3,6=minor chord. I hope that helped. This applies to all instruments,but most visilbe on the keyboard. Peace.
+Rep, very informative post.


I used to find it helpful to keep the intervals for minor and major scales written on a notecard, so regardless of the root note I could I always find the other notes...I had this taped to my wall for years:


Major - Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Whole, Half
Minor - Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole


The intervals are in steps btw, whole steps / half steps...

  • dibts
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Re: Stuck in D minor
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2015, 07:52:39 AM »
Try experimenting with keys that are not from its family. Or you can also research on some plugins that will help you create new chord patterns.