Author Topic: Sound Equalization Guides  (Read 2574 times)

  • 2infamouz
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Sound Equalization Guides
« on: April 08, 2013, 08:34:48 PM »
EQ is probably one of the most important and effective tools when it comes to mixing. The main thing that was a game changer for the way I mixed was learning how to properly use sound equalization. Here's a couple useful resources for learning the basics of sound EQ:

Audio Equalization on wikipedia explains the technical aspects of the process, but doesn't really help with learning how to use it :
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equalization_(audio)

Sound On Sound is an awesome resource for almost anything related to music production, and their sound EQ article is great for beginners:
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/1995_articles/mar95/eq.html

This is a pretty legit sound equalization guide with audio examples:
http://audio.tutsplus.com/tutorials/production/the-basics-of-equalization/

Here's a guide I wrote on 2infamouz about sound EQ called "What is a Sound Equalizer?"
What is a Sound Equalizer?

Here's a quote from my Sound Equalization guide if you decide not to read the whole thing:
Quote
“Forming Your Mix”
 
There are no set in stone rules when using a sound equalizer. Every instrument (and every mix) is different.
 
The first thing you want to do before you start turning knobs is listen. Try to figure out what needs to change in the sound of the instrument, if anything. Also listen to all the instruments in your mix together. Find out where you need to make room for instruments being masked, what needs to be cut and what needs to be boosted. If your kick drum isn’t standing out, chances are the lows of your other instruments (more than likely your bass guitar/synth is the culprit) are drowning out the kick. If you’re mix sounds too dull you might need to increase the “brightness” of some instruments (5000-8000hz). If you have irritating frequencies in an instrument making you cringe and grind your teeth, you probably need to cut some of the mids out (800-5000hz). Listening is critical, and you always want to know what the problem is before you try to fix it. If you just start cutting and boosting frequencies without understanding what you’re doing you’ll probably end up making things worse.

  • DJ Bangher
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Re: Sound Equalization Guides
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2013, 06:29:43 AM »
Aww yeah this is some good ****. I saw the wikipedia one before but not the others. I really needa get this EQ ish down n step my game up

  • 2infamouz
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Re: Sound Equalization Guides
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2013, 05:28:40 PM »
Thanks DJ Bangher, you won't regret investing the time to learn EQ. I can't think of very many tools in the studio as important as equalization, at least in terms of mixing.

  • SkinTight
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Re: Sound Equalization Guides
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2013, 09:55:04 AM »
Looks good, i'll try it.

  • deebee
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Re: Sound Equalization Guides
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2013, 01:50:28 PM »
EQ is the absolute best that I am aware of so far. If someone knows about something better, please let me know so that I may test it out. The sound is so crisp and clear. It is ultra magnificent. All you professionals out there know what I mean. Everyone who is not a professional just yet, will soon see what I mean.

  • 2infamouz
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Re: Sound Equalization Guides
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2013, 05:40:42 PM »
Welcome to Record and Produce Deebee. It sounds like you're confused about what EQ is, but if you read the guides maybe it'll make more sense to you lol...