Author Topic: Does it matter?  (Read 1134 times)

  • Key343
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Does it matter?
« on: April 19, 2015, 03:44:46 PM »
When you use different strings does it matter? Will it change the sound?

Re: Does it matter?
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2015, 06:34:49 PM »
Steel and nylon strings do indeed have different sounds. It’s the difference between say, a Rodrigo y Gabriela song (classical guitars, therefore nylon) and a song like "Golden Teeth and Silver Medals" by A Camp which sounds brighter and more crisp. To play most contemporary music you’ll probably want steel strings, though they’re harder on the fingers than nylon strings.

Re: Does it matter?
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2015, 05:01:13 PM »
I didn't even know that was a thing. I'm such a guitar newbie. LOL.

  • LoveAsArson
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Re: Does it matter?
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2015, 11:55:19 AM »
I know this thread is kind of old but I wanted to point out that different types of strings definitely matter from my experience playing electric guitar. For example, I play a Fender Jaguar through a vintage Twin Reverb which is an extremely bright set up. I felt like my guitar had too much treble so I switched to a higher gauge string which made a huge difference. Thicker strings are less bright so they lower the treble response a little bit which can lead to a thicker sound. While I have normal nickel wound strings on my guitar now, I used to have it set up for flat wound strings which provided a more warm sound. Even ignoring the sound differences, different types of string can effect how you play the guitar. Some people like lower gauge strings because they're easier to bend. Others like higher gauge strings because they don't break as easily.

It's really worth trying different strings out the more you get into playing guitar. It's a cost effective way to make a guitar sound better to your ears.

Re: Does it matter?
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2015, 03:19:55 AM »
I know this thread is kind of old but I wanted to point out that different types of strings definitely matter from my experience playing electric guitar. For example, I play a Fender Jaguar through a vintage Twin Reverb which is an extremely bright set up. I felt like my guitar had too much treble so I switched to a higher gauge string which made a huge difference. Thicker strings are less bright so they lower the treble response a little bit which can lead to a thicker sound. While I have normal nickel wound strings on my guitar now, I used to have it set up for flat wound strings which provided a more warm sound. Even ignoring the sound differences, different types of string can effect how you play the guitar. Some people like lower gauge strings because they're easier to bend. Others like higher gauge strings because they don't break as easily.

It's really worth trying different strings out the more you get into playing guitar. It's a cost effective way to make a guitar sound better to your ears.

Couldn't agree more!
Much of what I like to play as a guitarist is metal, and I can't stress enough how much more satisfying it is for me to have nice, thick strings. Indeed, they are more durable for all that furious picking, but man, the sound I got from those strings in those hard, heavy riffs made all the difference.
Thinner, brighter strings by contrast, really made my sound pop when I recorded some old black metal project; so that said, it can be a great tool to use depeding on what you want to play and can also allow your playing some versatility, so definitely experiment with strings and see what works for you or what strings you can match to a sound/genre or set of techniques you're looking to work with.

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Re: Does it matter?
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2015, 11:03:46 AM »
Exactly. A lot of people don't give thought to the type of strings they use. I've commonly heard other guitar players tell me they buy Brand X strings because that's what they've always bought or that's what came on the guitar. Swapping string types is one of the easiest and most cost effective way of changing your guitar's tone. That one simple step can make your guitar sound way better than it did before. It could save you from buying a new guitar.

  • tasha
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Re: Does it matter?
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2015, 05:48:20 AM »
It does change the sound a little as well as using the plectrum on certain guitars too. A fender plectrum used on an acoustic guitar can even alter the sound.
Use the correct tools for the job if you want to be taken seriously as a musician. if you are not sure what to use ask someone to help you because there are different strengths etc that can effect your play.

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Re: Does it matter?
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2015, 12:38:16 PM »
Yeah, honestly just go to a guitar shop and tell them what kind of music you're looking to play and what guitar you have. They will steer you in the right direction. I know it can be confusing looking at different packs of strings that don't really give you any indication of what kind of music they're meant to play. It's probably also always a good idea to change your strings when you're thinking about it since they don't last nearly as long as a lot of people think.  I really need to put a set on soon because I have a show coming up.

Re: Does it matter?
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2015, 05:43:16 PM »
Yes, it absolutely does matter and it makes a big difference. Acoustic strings and electric strings are different, with there being two types of acoustic strings; steel (for dreadnought guitars) and nylon (for classical guitars). When playing acoustic I much prefer steel strings. However, I'm mainly a lead guitar and for me to be able to play properly I absolutely have to use gauge .09 Ernie Ball Slinky's.