Author Topic: What are some good software and guides for complete beginners?  (Read 996 times)

Lately, I've been messing around on audacity and I'm really enjoying it. What are some good guides and resources for a newbie like myself?

Re: What are some good software and guides for complete beginners?
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2015, 07:25:44 AM »
Audacity is great for a beginner. I personally use FL studio. It's got lots of elements. I suggest getting the manual at audacity.com. It's full of information. Good luck!

  • JPB_003
  • Audiophile
  • ***
  • Posts: 33
  • Respect: 10
    • View Profile
Re: What are some good software and guides for complete beginners?
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2015, 10:55:53 PM »
The best advice I can give for a beginner is use FL Studio, and watch tutorials.

Really, any DAW will get the job done it is just the tutorials for FL are best in my opinion.

If you want to use Abelton, or Logic, etc.. Go ahead and do the same thing.

All that really matters is you do it every day, and don't give up trying. It will sound pretty bad your first couple of months but you will get the hang of things.

  • Aladar
  • Audiophile
  • ***
  • Posts: 43
  • Respect: 3
    • View Profile
Re: What are some good software and guides for complete beginners?
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2015, 02:55:02 PM »
Thirding FL Studio. It's probably not a DAW you would want once you get more serious, since it has some limitations (although I will probably stay with it, since I mostly use prerecorded samples with my music, so it's absolutely adequate), but from my experience, it was the easiest to get hang of quickly and start doing music right away, without spending hours learning the basics and delaying your creative process. Some people also swear by Reaper, but I wouldn't recommend it for a complete newbie.

Re: What are some good software and guides for complete beginners?
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2015, 02:21:20 AM »
Thirding FL Studio. It's probably not a DAW you would want once you get more serious, since it has some limitations (although I will probably stay with it, since I mostly use prerecorded samples with my music, so it's absolutely adequate), but from my experience, it was the easiest to get hang of quickly and start doing music right away, without spending hours learning the basics and delaying your creative process. Some people also swear by Reaper, but I wouldn't recommend it for a complete newbie.

The software looks SUPER comprehensive which is great, but I'm worried that it'll slow down my laptop since it only has 4gb ram and an i3 core processor....

  • Wizdumb
  • Audio Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 64
  • Respect: 90
  • Everywhere I Go, Wizdumb is spread.
    • View Profile
Re: What are some good software and guides for complete beginners?
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2015, 09:04:19 AM »
Lately, I've been messing around on audacity and I'm really enjoying it. What are some good guides and resources for a newbie like myself?


I've really enjoyed the guides 2infamouz created (http://2infamouz.com), and also http://tweakheadz.com , http://www.soundonsound.com/ , and http://www.musictech.net/ for guides, tips, tutorials, sounds, etc...




As far as software, I feel that the majority are adequate for music production. If you're using a DAW to make music in, it mostly comes down to preferential things, as they almost all have the same features included. People used to try and convince me that DAWs like FL or Reaper weren't on par w/ the industry standard programs like protools, but I've since learned that you can literally reproduce identical work in almost all of the popular DAWs.
   

  • Aladar
  • Audiophile
  • ***
  • Posts: 43
  • Respect: 3
    • View Profile
Re: What are some good software and guides for complete beginners?
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2015, 01:34:37 PM »
Thirding FL Studio. It's probably not a DAW you would want once you get more serious, since it has some limitations (although I will probably stay with it, since I mostly use prerecorded samples with my music, so it's absolutely adequate), but from my experience, it was the easiest to get hang of quickly and start doing music right away, without spending hours learning the basics and delaying your creative process. Some people also swear by Reaper, but I wouldn't recommend it for a complete newbie.

The software looks SUPER comprehensive which is great, but I'm worried that it'll slow down my laptop since it only has 4gb ram and an i3 core processor....

Eh, well, all DAWs will be intensive on your PC. I ran FL Studio on my old PC with 4'GB RAM and a dualcore AMD without a problem though. You can just try an older version if it gets bad.